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Email: league@lwvrichardson.org
Phone: (972) 470-0584
LWV of Richardson
300 N Coit Rd, Suite 125
Richardson, TX 75080
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Future Events

August, 2022

Monday
15
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Wednesday
17
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Charlotte Forten Grimké. Charlotte was a 3rd-generation suffragist and equal rights advocate. She is a reminder that we make progress by standing on the shoulders of others, and that it can take multiple generations to right wrongs.

** Granddaughter of Charlotte Vandine Forten **

** Daughter of Robert Bridges Forten **

** Niece of Margaret, Harriet, and Sarah Forten **

Learn more:

-- National History Center: http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/maai/identity/text3/charlottefortenjournal.pdf

-- Suffragist Memorial: https://suffragistmemorial.org/african-american-women-leaders-in-the-suffrage-movement

-- PBS: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part3/3p477.html

-- NPS (19th Amendment): https://www.nps.gov/articles/african-american-women-and-the-nineteenth-amendment.htm

-- NPS (Voting Rights): https://www.nps.gov/articles/black-women-and-the-fight-for-voting-rights.htm
-- Journals of Charlotte Forten Grimke: https://www.google.com/books/edition/_/3uHylBU24jMC?hl=en&gbpv=1&pg=PP1

-- Muse: https://muse.jhu.edu/chapter/1945821

-- Beltway Poetry: http://www.beltwaypoetry.com/poetry/poets/names/grimke-charlotte-forten/
Thursday
18
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#OnThisDay, 1920 the 19th Amendment was ratified, granting women the right to vote. This amendment prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. The ratification was the culmination of the women‘s suffrage movement in the United States, which fought at both state and national levels to achieve the vote.

The amendment was passed by Congress (proposed) on June 4, 1919, and ratified on August 18, 1920.

Learn more:

-- National Women’s History Museum: http://www.crusadeforthevote.org/19-amendment

-- National Archive: https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/amendments-11-27
Friday
19
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Annie Webb Blanton, teacher, suffragist, and the first woman in Texas elected to statewide office, was born Aug 19, 1870, in Houston.

In the July 1918 primary, when Texas women exercised their voting rights for the first time, Blanton defeated incumbent Walter F. Doughty and Brandon Trussell by a large margin. In November, her victory in the general election made her the first woman in Texas elected to statewide office. She served as state superintendent through 1922.

Learn more:
-- TSHA: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fbl16
-- Humanities Texas https://www.humanitiestexas.org/programs/tx-originals/list/annie-webb-blanton
Monday
22
Mon, Aug 22, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Thursday
25
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Richardson Independent School District Board Meeting
Friday
26
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"The 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote nationally on August 18, 1920, so why is Women’s Equality Day on August 26th each year?

The simple answer is that even when a constitutional amendment has been ratified it’s not official until it has been certified by the correct government official. In 1920, that official was U.S. Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby. On August 26, 1920, Colby signed a proclamation behind closed doors at 8 a.m. at his own house in Washington, D.C, ending a struggle for the vote that started a century earlier." -- Constitution Center

The first executive secretary of the League of Women Voters, Minnie Fisher Cunningham, was a Texan who, among many other notable achievements, worked for the passage of the 19th Amendment in Texas and nationally.

Learn more:

-- Alice Paul Org: https://www.alicepaul.org/2020-exhibition/

-- Constitution Center: https://constitutioncenter.org/blog/why-august-26-is-known-as-womans-equality-day

-- LOC: https://www.loc.gov/collections/women-of-protest/articles-and-essays/tactics-and-techniques-of-the-national-womans-party-suffrage-campaign/

-- NCSL: https://www.ncsl.org/research/about-state-legislatures/amending-the-u-s-constitution.aspx

Image: https://www.alicepaul.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/5_Suffragist_Cover_1920.pdf
Saturday
27
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#OnThisDay in 1962, the 24th Amendment, which prohibited the use or a poll tax as a condition for voting in federal elections, was passed by Congress. #SystemicRacism

The amendment was passed by Congress (proposed) to the states on August 27, 1962, and ratified on January 23, 1964.

“After nearly disappearing in the states, a repurposed poll tax returned as part of a successful effort to undermine the Fifteenth Amendment and reestablish limits on the franchise. Beginning in Florida in 1889, all the former Confederate States, and a few others, instituted a suite of changes to voting laws as a part of this effort. They introduced literacy tests and disqualified convicted felons from voting. They also resurrected poll taxes. The historical record is filled with racially derogatory statements from delegates at State constitutional conventions who believed poll taxes and other devices would suppress Black voter registration and turnout.”

“The Supreme Court repeatedly affirmed the constitutionality of poll taxes. In its 1937 opinion in Breedlove v. Suttles, the Supreme Court unanimously rejected a claim from a white Georgia voter that the poll tax violated the Equal Protection Clause. In 1951, it rejected a similar claim challenging Virginia’s poll tax in Butler v. Thompson.” -- Constitution Center #CheckAndBalances #3Branches

Resources:

-- Constitution Center: https://constitutioncenter.org/interactive-constitution/amendment/amendment-xxiv

-- National Archive: https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/amendments-11-27

-- US House: https://history.house.gov/HistoricalHighlight/Detail/37045

-- Breedlove v. Suttles: https://perma.cc/6G6H-6U4T

-- Butler v. Thompson: https://perma.cc/V4JP-TYHY
Sunday
28
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#OnThisDay in 1963, approximately 250,000 people took part in The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Martin Luther King gave the closing address in front of the Lincoln Memorial:

“I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal."

Learn more:

-- King Institute: https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-papers/documents/i-have-dream-address-delivered-march-washington-jobs-and-freedom

-- Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=173&v=smEqnnklfYs&feature=emb_logo

-- Constitution Center: https://constitutioncenter.org/blog/10-fascinating-facts-about-the-i-have-a-dream-speech

-- Civil Rights Library: http://crdl.usg.edu/events/march_on_washington
Monday
29
Mon, Aug 29, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Monday
29
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#OnThisDay in 1983, the 68th Texas legislature passed HB718, which abolished the life-time voting ban on ex-felons, but included a 5-yr waiting period before ex-felons would become eligible to vote.

On Sept 1, 1997, the 75th Texas legislature passed HB1001 eliminated the 5-yr waiting period.

Learn more:

-- TSLL: https://guides.sll.texas.gov/reentry-resources/voting

-- 75th #TXLege Summary: https://lrl.texas.gov/scanned/Sessionoverviews/summary/75soe.pdf#page=114 (pg. 114)

-- 68th #TXLege Summary: https://lrl.texas.gov/scanned/sessionOverviews/summary/soe68.pdf#page=82 (pg. 77)

-- HB1001 Text: https://lrl.texas.gov/LASDOCS/75R/HB1001/HB1001_75R.pdf

-- HB718 Text: https://lrl.texas.gov/LASDOCS/68R/HB718/HB718_68R.pdf#page=23 (pg. 23)

-- HB718 Election Law Opinion: https://www.sos.state.tx.us/elections/elo/jwf20.pdf

-- JSTOR: https://www.jstor.org/stable/29768353?read-now=1&seq=4#page_scan_tab_contents (pg. 82)
Tuesday
30
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Myra Davis Hemmings. Hemmings was born in Gonzales, Texas. She was one of the founders of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. as well as its first president. The sorority was founded at Howard University in Jan 1913 and its 1st public act was to participate in the Woman Suffrage Procession in Washington, D.C. in Mar of 1913.

Suffragist Mary Church Terrell lobbied on behalf of the Deltas to win them a place in the parade, where they were the only African American organization represented. #HiddenFigures

A Texas Historical Marker dedicated to Myra resides at the Myra Davis Hemmings Resource Center in Bexar County, TX.

Photo credit: San Antonio Alumnae Chapter of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

Learn More:

-- @usgpo: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CREC-2013-01-24/html/CREC-2013-01-24-pt1-PgS292.htm

-- @TxHistComm: https://atlas.thc.texas.gov/Details/5507017358/print

-- @TxStHistAssoc: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhe64

-- @dstinc1913: https://www.deltasigmatheta.org
Wednesday
31
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Lulu Belle Madison White. Lulu Belle was a civil rights activist who worked to eliminate the white primary in the 1930s. In 1939, she became the president of the Houston chapter of the NAACP. After the SCOTUS ruling in 1944 that outlawed the white primary (Smith v. Allwright), she worked tirelessly to encourage voting and educate voters.

Learn more:

-- TSHA Handbook: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fwh75

-- TSHA Honest Past (p. 337): https://join.tshaonline.org/ebook-offers/honest-past/SHQ-An-Honest-Past.pdf

-- WTH: https://www.womenintexashistory.org/audio/lulu-belle-madison-white

-- Humanities of TX: https://www.humanitiestexas.org/news/articles/craft-civil-rights

September, 2022

Thursday
1
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Ann Richards. In 1976, Ann became the 1st woman elected to the Travis County Commissioners Court. In 1982, Ann became the 1st woman elected as Texas State Treasurer, which was the 1st time a woman had been elected to statewide office in Texas since Miriam Ferguson‘s successful gubernatorial race in 1932--breaking a 50-yr absence of women in statewide leadership. In 1990, Ann became the 2nd woman to serve as governor of Texas since Texas became a state in 1845.

Learn more:
-- https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fri62
Thursday
1
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#OnThisDay in 1997, the 75th TX legislature, passed HB1001, which amended the Election Code to clarify the voting rights (eligibility) of fully discharged ex-felons, and it eliminated the 5-year waiting period established by HB718.

In 1983, the 68th Session of the TX Leg passed HB718, which abolished the life-time voting ban on ex-felons, but included a 5-year waiting period before ex-felons would become eligible to vote.

Learn more:

-- TXSLL: https://guides.sll.texas.gov/reentry-resources/voting

-- TXSOS: https://www.sos.state.tx.us/elections/elo/jwf20.pdf

-- 75th #TXLege Summary: https://lrl.texas.gov/scanned/Sessionoverviews/summary/75soe.pdf#page=114 (pg. 114)

-- 68th #TXLege Summary: https://lrl.texas.gov/scanned/sessionOverviews/summary/soe68.pdf#page=82 (pg. 77)

-- HB1001 Text: https://lrl.texas.gov/LASDOCS/75R/HB1001/HB1001_75R.pdf

-- HB718 Text: https://lrl.texas.gov/LASDOCS/68R/HB718/HB718_68R.pdf#page=23 (pg. 23)

-- HB718 Election Law Opinion: https://www.sos.state.tx.us/elections/elo/jwf20.pdf

-- JSTOR: https://www.jstor.org/stable/29768353?read-now=1&seq=4#page_scan_tab_contents (pg. 82)
Friday
2
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This Labor Day we’re recognizing the contributions of laborers by taking a look back at the impact of labor unions on the women’s suffrage movement.

Did you know that middle and upper-class suffragists learned to use parades and picketing from working-class suffragists who were members of labor unions?

“Since the beginning of the women’s rights movement, women who devoted their lives to reform often were middle and upper-class women. Women who worked to support themselves and their families had less time and funds to devote to social movements.

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, however, working women began supporting suffrage in greater numbers. They joined labor unions, held strikes for higher pay, and protested for better working conditions. Working women started seeing the vote as a way to gain more political power to further these causes.

Harriot Stanton Blatch, daughter of suffrage leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton, was among the first suffragists to recruit working women to support suffrage. She started collaborating with the Women’s Trade Union League, founded in 1905, to help women form unions and advocate for labor reforms. In 1907, she founded the Equality League of Self-Supporting Women (later called the Women’s Political Union) to attract working women to the suffrage movement. Blatch also wanted to integrate the more aggressive, militant tactics of labor activists—like parades through city streets and speakers on street corners—into the suffrage strategies to attract more publicity. Working women and their experience with the tactics of labor activists proved vital to winning the vote.” Allison Lange, Ph.D. https://www.loc.gov/resource/ggbain.02144/

Learn more:

-- Crusade for the Vote: http://www.crusadeforthevote.org/working-women-movement

-- LOC: https://www.loc.gov/static/collections/women-of-protest/images/tactics.pdf

-- DOL: https://www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history
Wednesday
7
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JJoin us in celebrating the birthday of Jovita Idár. Idarwas born in 1885 and was an American journalist and civil rights activist who wrote about the challenges Mexican Americans faced in Texas. Her activism was influenced by the lynching of ethnic-Mexican men in South Texas during the early 20th century. She also used her platform as a journalist to support suffrage.

Learn more:

-- PBS (Unladylike): https://unladylike2020.com/profile/jovita-idar

-- TXWF: https://www.txwf.org/champions-for-change-jovita-idar-and-the-villareal-sisters/

-- Women‘s History: https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/jovita-idar

-- TSHA Handbook: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fid03

-- TSHA Honest Past (p. 196): https://join.tshaonline.org/ebook-offers/honest-past/SHQ-An-Honest-Past.pdf

-- Humanities of Texas: https://www.humanitiestexas.org/programs/tx-originals/list/jovita-idar

-- Hidden Figures: https://www.brandywine.org/museum/hidden-figures-suffrage-movement


Photo Credit: General Photographs, UTSA Special Collections (@UTSA)
Friday
9
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#OnThisDay, Eisenhower signed the Civil Rights Act (CRA) of 1957 into law. The act established the Civil Rights Section of the Justice Department and empowered federal prosecutors to obtain court injunctions against interference with the right to vote. #CivilRights #VotingRights

This was the 1st civil rights legislation since Reconstruction (1875).

Timeline:

-- 1866 Johnson vetos CRA of 1866, but veto is overridden by Congress (define citizenship and guaranteed citizens equal protection)

-- 1875 Grant signs CRA of 1875 (guaranteed African Americans equal treatment in public accommodations, public transportation, and prohibited their exclusion from jury service)

-- 1883 SCOTUS rules 7-1 that CRA of 1875 is unconstitutional

-- 1957 Eisenhower signs CRA of 1957 (forms the Civil Rights Commission)

-- 1960 Eisenhower signs CRA of 1960 (guaranteed qualified voters the right to register to vote

-- 1964 Johnson signs CRA of 1964 (prohibited discrimination in public accommodations and employment)

-- 1968 Johnson signs CRA of 1968 (guaranteed equal housing opportunities)

-- 1991 Bush signs the CRA of 1991 (expanded the rights of women and disabled persons)

Resources:

--Civil Rights Digital Library: http://crdl.usg.edu/events/civil_rights_act_1957

--Eisenhower Library: https://www.dwightdeisenhower.com/383/Civil-Rights-Act-of-1957

--Library of Congress: https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-rights-act/civil-rights-era-timeline.html

Photo credit: Photographs of Official Activities of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1953 - 1961, US National Archives .https://catalog.archives.gov/id/7865612 (@USNatArchives)
Monday
12
Mon, Sep 12, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Wednesday
14
The Dog Haus Biergarten (Need to bring flyer in below link)
6:00 PM
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Come join us at The Dog Haus Biergarten between 6 and 8:30 PM. Click on the event to get a link to the flyer to bring for LWV Richardson to get some of the proceeds. Open to all members and anyone wanting to socialize with our members.
Thursday
15
Thu, Sep 15, 2022
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Richardson Independent School District Board Meeting
Saturday
17
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Today is Constitution and Citizenship Day, so we would like to take this opportunity to congratulate all recently naturalized American citizens. We hope an LWV volunteer was present at your naturalization ceremony to assist you with becoming a registered voter.

Learn more:

-- @LWVTexas: https://my.lwv.org/texas/register-vote

-- @librarycongress: https://www.loc.gov/law/help/commemorative-observations/constitution-day.php

-- @uscis: https://www.uscis.gov/citizenship/educators/constitution-day-and-citizenship-day
Saturday
17
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Mary Burnett Talbert. Mary was an American orator, civil rights activist, and suffragist. She believed that race and gender were unifying factors that could help resolve class issues. Talbert became one of the first women to join the NAACP after its founding in 1909.
#WomenInLeadership

Learn more:
-- https://www.womenofthehall.org/inductee/mary-burnett-talbert (https://www.womenofthehall.org/inductee/mary-burnett-talbert/)
-- https://www.blackpast.org/african-american-history/talbert-mary-b-1866-1923 (https://www.blackpast.org/african-american-history/talbert-mary-b-1866-1923/)
-- https://suffragistmemorial.org/mary-burnett-talbert-september-17-1866-1923 (https://suffragistmemorial.org/mary-burnett-talbert-september-17-1866-1923)
Monday
19
Mon, Sep 19, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Friday
23
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Mary Church Terrell. Mary was a civil-rights activist who championed racial equality and women’s suffrage in the late 19th and early 20th century.

Learn more:
-- PBS (@unladylike2020): https://unladylike2020.com/profile/mary-church-terrell-2
-- Womens History (@womenshistory): https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/mary-church-terrell
-- LOC (@libraryofcongress): https://crowd.loc.gov/campaigns/mary-church-terrell-advocate-for-african-americans-and-women
-- NPS (@NPS) - https://www.nps.gov/people/mary-church-terrell.htm
-- https://suffragistmemorial.org/mary-church-terrell/
Monday
26
Mon, Sep 26, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting

October, 2022

Saturday
1
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LGBT History Month is celebrated every October in United States since 1994. It was first proposed by Missouri high school history teacher Rodney Wilson, who chose October due to the establishment of National Coming Out Day in the late 1980s on October 11. October also marks the first National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, which took place in 1979. In addition to LGBT History Month, LGBT Pride Month is also celebrated each year in June to commemorate the Stonewall Riots.
Monday
3
Mon, Oct 3, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Monday
3
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On Oct 3, 1965, Johnson signs the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) of 1965, which amended the 1952 INA by including a provision stating: No person shall receive any preference or priority or be discriminated against in the issuance of an immigrant visa because of the person‘s race, sex, nationality, place of birth, or place of residence.

Timeline:

1924 - Coolidge signs Johnson-Reed Act
Prevents immigration from Asia and establishes a quotas system

1952 - Truman vetoes McCarran-Walter Act (veto overridden by Congress)
Eliminates Asian exclusion and establishes a preference system for desirable ethnic groups

1965 - Johnson signs Hart-Celler Act
Eliminates policy of limiting immigration based on national origin

Note: See https://immigrationhistory.org/timeline for a description of immigration laws before 1924

Resources:

Johnson-Reed Act: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1921-1936/immigration-act

McCarran-Walter Act: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1945-1952/immigration-act

Hart-Celler Act: https://history.house.gov/Historical-Highlights/1951-2000/Immigration-and-Nationality-Act-of-1965

Coolidge’s INA Comments: https://www.coolidgefoundation.org/blog/were-all-in-the-same-boat-now-coolidge-on-immigration

Truman’s INA Comments: https://www.trumanlibrary.gov/public/Immigration_TrumanVeto.pdf

Johnson’s INA Comments:http://www.lbjlibrary.org/lyndon-baines-johnson/timeline/lbj-on-immigration
Thursday
6
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Thomas Mundy Peterson. Thomas, on March 31, 1870 (one day after the ratification of the 15th Amendment) became the first Black American to vote in a U.S. election.

Learn more:
-- Smithsonian: https://nmaahc.si.edu/object/nmaahc_2015.190
-- NJ State HIstory; https://nj.gov/state/historical/it-happened-here/ihhnj-er-peterson.pdf
-- Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlC3fsW3rRs
Sunday
9
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Mary Ann Shadd Cary.

Learn more: https://suffragistmemorial.org/african-american-women-leaders-in-the-suffrage-movement/
Monday
10
Mon, Oct 10, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Tuesday
11
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Eleanor Roosevelt born on this day in 1884.

After the League of Women Voters was founded in 1920 – the same year that Franklin D. Roosevelt ran for Vice President – she helped establish its policy agenda. As the League’s Vice President of Legislative Affairs, she lobbied for reforms in Congress and worked tirelessly to strengthen women’s role in politics, helping mobilize women voters through the League’s nonpartisan training and lobbying work.

Learn more:

-- LWV: https://www.lwv.org/blog/eleanor-roosevelt-first-lady-league-leader-pioneer

Photo Credit: LC-USZ62-25812, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division (@librarycongress)

http://loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3c08091/
Tuesday
11
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National Coming Out Day (NCOD) is an annual LGBTQ awareness day observed on October 11. The day commemorates the Oct. 11, 1987 March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, which included half a million participants.

Learn more:
-- HRC: https://www.hrc.org/resources/the-history-of-coming-out
-- APA: https://www.apa.org/pi/lgbt/resources/coming-out-day
-- GLAAD: https://www.glaad.org/tags/national-coming-out-day
-- Archive: https://gaycenter.org/archive_item/march-on-washington-for-lesbian-and-gay-rights
-- Image: https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc276218
Wednesday
12
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"In 1977 participants at the United Nations International Conference on Discrimination against Indigenous Populations in the Americas proposed that Indigenous Peoples’ Day replace Columbus Day.Indigenous Peoples’ Day recognizes that Native people are the first inhabitants of the Americas, including the lands that later became the United States of America. And it urges Americans to rethink history." https://www.smithsonianmag.com/blogs/national-museum-american-indian/2019/10/11/indigenous-peoples-day-2019

The following states and the District of Columbia observe Native American or Indigenous Peoples’ Day, in place of or in addition to Columbus Day:

-- Alabama

-- Alaska

-- District of Columbia

-- Hawaii

-- Idaho

-- Maine

-- Michigan

-- Minnesota

-- New Mexico

-- North Carolina

-- Oklahoma

-- Oregon

-- South Dakota

-- Vermont

-- Wisconsin


The state of Texas does not currently observer Indiginous People day, but the following local jurisdiction have made the change:

-- City of Austin

-- City of Dallas

-- City of San Antonio

-- County of Bexar



Learn more:

-- Smithsonian Mag: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/blogs/national-museum-american-indian/2019/10/11/indigenous-peoples-day-2019/:

-- PBS: https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/npr/2019/10/14/769083847/columbus-day-or-indigenous-peoples-day/
Saturday
15
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#OnThisDay, the Supreme Court of the US (SCOTUS) ruled on a bundle of five cases (known as the Civil Rights Cases), and in an 8-1 decision, the court found the Civil Rights Act (CRA) of 1875 to be unconstitutional.

The CRA of 1875 was signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant and was enacted during Reconstruction in response to civil rights violations against African Americans. The act guaranteed equal treatment in public accommodations and transportation. It also outlawing race-based discrimination in jury duty/selection. The five cases heard by SCOTUS included suites brought forth by African Americans who were denied access to segregated facilities.


Timeline:

-- 1866 Johnson vetos CRA of 1866, but veto is overridden by Congress (define citizenship and guaranteed citizens equal protection)
-- 1875 Grant signs CRA of 1875 (guaranteed African Americans equal treatment in public accommodations, public transportation, and prohibited their exclusion from jury service)
-- 1883 SCOTUS rules 7-1 that CRA of 1875 is unconstitutional
-- 1957 Eisenhower signs CRA of 1957 (forms the Civil Rights Commission)
-- 1960 Eisenhower signs CRA of 1960 (guaranteed qualified voters the right to register to vote
-- 1964 Johnson signs CRA of 1964 (prohibited discrimination in public accommodations and employment)
-- 1968 Johnson signs CRA of 1968 (guaranteed equal housing opportunities)
-- 1991 Bush signs the CRA of 1991 (expanded the rights of women and disabled persons)

Resources: SCOTUS Ruling:
http://cdn.loc.gov/service/ll/usrep/usrep109/usrep109003/usrep109003.pdf
Library of Congress: https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-rights-act/legal-events-timeline.html
Monday
17
Mon, Oct 17, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Wednesday
19
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The League of Women Voters of Texas, a nonpartisan political organization, was formed on October 19, 1919, at San Antonio, when the Texas Equal Suffrage Association was dissolved to reorganize for a new purposehttps://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/wel05
Thursday
20
Thu, Oct 20, 2022
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Richardson Independent School District Board Meeting
Saturday
22
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Christia Daniel Adair. Christia was an NAACP leader from Houston, worked for full suffrage and was one of the first black women to vote in a Democratic primary after the Supreme Court struck down Texas‘ white primary law in 1944. As executive secretary of the Houston NAACP for 12 years, she and others desegregated the Houston airport, public libraries, city buses, and department store dressing rooms. Despite official harassment, Adair and others rebuilt the Houston NAACP chapter, which grew to 10,000 members.

Learn more:
https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fad19
Sunday
23
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Nina Otero-Warren. Nina was a civil rights leader, a suffragist, and an advocate for bilingual education.

In 1917, Otero-Warren was selected by Alice Paul to head the New Mexico chapter of the Congressional Union (precursor to the National Woman’s Party). She insisted that suffrage literature be published in both English and Spanish, in order to reach the widest audience.

She was Superintendent of Public Schools in Santa Fe County from 1918 to 1929, working to improve the conditions in rural Hispano and Native American communities. Otero-Warren argued that both Spanish and English be allowed in schools, despite the federal mandate of English-only. Despite losing her political campaign to run for a seat in the US House of Representatives, she remained politically and socially active, and served as the Chairman of New Mexico’s Board of Health; an executive board member of the American Red Cross; and director of an adult literacy program in New Mexico for the Works Projects Administration.

Learn more: https://www.nps.gov/people/nina-oter-warren.htm
Monday
24
Mon, Oct 24, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Tuesday
25
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Join LWV-Richardson members just to socialize

November, 2022

Wednesday
2
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Jessie Daniel Ames. Jessie was a suffragist and the founder and first president of the League of Women Voters of Texas.

Learn more: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fam06
Thursday
3
Thu, Nov 3, 2022
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Richardson Independent School District Board Meeting
Monday
7
Mon, Nov 7, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Tuesday
8
Election Day
Tue, Nov 8, 2022
Friday
11
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Veterans Day, also known as Armistice Day or Rememberance Day in other countries which fought in the First World War, is commemorated on the 11th of November, marking the armistice signed between the Allies and Central Powers. The armistice came into effect at 11am: the eleventh hour, of the eleventh day, of the eleventh month in 1918. Formerly known as Armistice Day in the United States, the name was changed to Veterans Day in 1954 to honor all those who have served and continue to serve in the United States Armed Forces.
Saturday
12
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Elizabeth Cady Staton (1st generation suffragists). She was born in 1815 and was one of the speakers and organizers of the Seneca Falls Convention. Elizabeth was a co-founder of the National Woman Suffrage Associate (NWSA), which would later merge with the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA) to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) in 1890. After the ratification of the 19th Amendment, the NAWSA evolved into the League of Women Voters (LWV) in 1920.

** Mother of Harriet Stanton Blatch (2nd generation suffragist) **
Learn more:

-- NWHM: https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/lucy-stone

-- PBS: https://www.pbs.org/video/the-vote-part-1-3kph5d (11 minutes in)

-- LOC: https://www.loc.gov/resource/rbnawsa.n8361/?sp=7 (p. 7)

-- Seneca Falls Convention:
Monday
14
Mon, Nov 14, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Monday
21
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#OnThisDay, Bush signed the 1991 Civil Rights Act (CRA), which provided the right to trial by jury on discrimination claims. It also added provisions to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that expanded the rights of women and disabled persons. #CivilRights

Timeline:
-- 1866 Johnson vetos CRA of 1866, but veto is overridden by Congress (define citizenship and guaranteed citizens equal protection)
-- 1875 Grant signs CRA of 1875 (guaranteed African Americans equal treatment in public accommodations, public transportation, and prohibited their exclusion from jury service)
-- 1883 SCOTUS rules 7-1 that CRA of 1875 is unconstitutional
-- 1957 Eisenhower signs CRA of 1957 (forms the Civil Rights Commission)
-- 1960 Johnson signs CRA of 1960 (guaranteed qualified voters the right to register to vote
-- 1964 Johnson signs CRA of 1964 (prohibited discrimination in public accommodations and employment)
-- 1968 Johnson signs CRA of 1968 (guaranteed equal housing opportunities)
-- 1991 Bush signs the CRA of 1991 (expanded the rights of women and disabled persons)

Resources:
Bush Library: https://bush41library.tamu.edu/archives/public-papers/3660
Library of Congress: https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-rights-act/legal-events-timeline.html
Saturday
26
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Sojourner Truth (1797-1883) was an American abolitionist and women‘s rights activist. Born into slavery in Ulster County, New York, Truth escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826. After going to court to recover her son, in 1828 she became the first black woman to win such a case against a white man. She gave herself the name Sojourner Truth in 1843 after she became convinced that God had called her to "testify the hope that was in me." Truth‘s best-known speech was famously delivered extemporaneously in 1851 at the Ohio Women‘s Rights Convention in which she demanded equal human rights for all women as well as for all blacks. During the Civil War, Truth helped recruit black troops for the Union Army and began riding in Washington DC‘s streetcars to force their desegregation. Following the war, Truth lobbied the federal government for seven years attempting to secure land grands for formerly enslaved persons, though this effort was ultimately unsuccessful. A lifelong radical, Truth continued her activism on behalf of women‘s rights, prison reform, and against capital punishment until the time of her death in 1883.
Tuesday
29
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Join LWV-Richardson members just to socialize
Wednesday
30
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Shirley Chisholm (1924-2005). Shirley was an educator, activist, and politician who achieved a number of historic 1sts
-- 1968 1st black woman elected to the Congress
-- 1972 1st woman to run for the Democratic presidential nomination
-- 1972 1st African American to run for President of the US

Learn more: https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/shirley-chisholm

December, 2022

Thursday
1
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On Dec 1, 1955, Rosa Parks was arrested for sitting in the front of a bus. Her arrest set off a chain of events that led to a Supreme Court decision banning segregation on public transportation.

Learn more:

-- LOC article: https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/december-01/

-- LOC recording: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-19-107/?loclr=eaue
Friday
2
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Debra Anne Haaland. Debra and Sharice Davids were the first two Native American women elected to the U.S Congress. Haaland is a member of the Laguna Pueblo people.

Learn more:

-- National Geographic Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5T_s36-1hms
-- US House: https://haaland.house.gov/about
Monday
5
Mon, Dec 5, 2022
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Richardson City Council Meeting
Tuesday
6
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Patsy Takemoto Mink. Patsy was the first woman of color elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.

Learn more:
-- Smithsonian Mag: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/how-women-got-vote-far-more-complex-story-history-textbooks-reveal-180971869/
-- House History: https://history.house.gov/People/detail/18329
-- NWHF: https://www.womenofthehall.org/inductee/patsy-takemoto-mink/
-- NWHM: https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/patsy-mink
Thursday
8
Thu, Dec 8, 2022
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Richardson Independent School District Board Meeting
Friday
9
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Titus Howard Mundine, who was the 1st Texas Legislator to propose enfranchisement of women and blacks.

"Every person, without distinction of sex, who shall have arrived at the age of twenty-one years...shall be deemed a qualified elector." -- Titus H. Mundine

Learn More:
-- https://lrl.texas.gov/legeLeaders/members/memberDisplay.cfm?memberID=5124
-- Titus – http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fmuvf
-- Woman Suffrage – http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/viw01
Monday
12
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Eliza Eubanks Peterson Johnson. Eliza was a suffragist and civil-rights activist.

Learn more:

-- TSHA: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fjohn

-- TSHA: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/viw01

-- Austin Library: http://www.austinlibrary.com/ahc/suffrage/early.htm
Wednesday
14
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin. Marie was a suffragist and lawyer who worked as an advocate for the Ojibwa/Chippewa Nation in Minnesota and North Dakota.

Learn more:

-- Hidden Figures: https://www.brandywine.org/museum/hidden-figures-suffrage-movement

-- National Parks Service: https://www.nps.gov/people/marie-louise-bottineau-baldwin.htm

-- MNHS: https://www.mnhs.org/historycenter/activities/museum/votes-for-women/profiles/marie-baldwin

-- National Archive: https://prologue.blogs.archives.gov/2020/04/02/19th-amendment-at-100-mary-louise-bottineau-baldwin/

-- LWV: https://my.lwv.org/california/diablo-valley/meet-suffragist-marie-louise-bottineau-baldwin
Thursday
15
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Ruza Wenclawska (also known as Rose Winslow). Rose was a Polish-American suffragist and trade union organizer. She was a member of the National Women‘s Party and fought for the rights of immigrant and working-class women. Along with Alice Paul, she participated in a hunger strike to bring attention to the suffrage movement.

Learn more:

-- Hidden Figures: https://www.brandywine.org/museum/hidden-figures-suffrage-movement

-- LOC: https://www.loc.gov/collections/women-of-protest/articles-and-essays/selected-leaders-of-the-national-womans-party/officers-and-national-organizers/

-- Turning Point: https://suffragistmemorial.org/rose-winslow-d-1977

-- Historical Snapshot: https://historicalsnaps.com/2018/03/19/rose-winslow-talks-about-her-hunger-strike
Saturday
17
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Harriet Taylor Upton. Harriet was a founding member of the National League of Women Voters and the first woman to become a vice-chairman of the Republican National Committee.

Learn more:

-- PBS: https://www.pbs.org/video/the-vote-part-1-3kph5d (53 mins in)

-- Upton House: http://www.uptonhouse.org/HTayor.html

-- Ohio History: https://ohiohistorycentral.org/w/Harriet_T._Upton
Thursday
29
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Martha Goodwin Tunstall. Martha became the vice-president from Texas of the newly-formed National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA).

Learn more: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/ftuns
Friday
30
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Jane McCallum. Jane was the first vice president of the League of Women Voters of Texas. She had the longest term as the Secretary of State of Texas.

Learn more:

-- TSHA: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fmc07

-- Texas Secretary as State: https://www.sos.state.tx.us/about/history.shtml
Saturday
31
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Every even year inJanuary VDRs need to renew their certification


VDRs serve for two-year terms expiring on December 31 of even-numbered years.

https://my.lwv.org/texas/volunteer-deputy-registrar

January, 2023

Sunday
1
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First day to apply for a ballot by mail using Application for a Ballot by Mail (ABBM) or Federal Postcard Application (FPCA) https://www.sos.state.tx.us/elections/voter/important-election-dates.shtml
Tuesday
3
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Lucretia Coffin Mott. Lucretia was a suffragist and human rights activist. She was one of the organizers of the 1st Woman’s Rights Convention Seneca Falls, N.Y.

Learn more:

NWHM: https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/lucretia-mott

PBS: Video: https://www.pbs.org/video/the-vote-part-1-3kph5d/

NPS: https://www.nps.gov/wori/learn/historyculture/lucretia-mott.htm
Tuesday
3
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Helen Edmunds Moore. Helen was a nurse, suffragist, and a member of the 41, 42, and 44th legislatures. In the 44 Legislature, she was the only woman.

Learn more:
https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/moore-helen-edmunds
Thursday
12
Thu, Jan 12, 2023
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Richardson Independent School District Board Meeting
Friday
20
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Harriet Staton Blatch (2nd generation suffragists).
Voting rights was a family affair

** Daughter of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1st generation suffragist)

She founded the Equality League of Self-Supporting Women, later called the Women‘s Political Union, whose membership was based on working women, both professional and industrial. The Equality League initiated the practice of holding suffrage parades and organized the first open-air suffrage rallies in thirty years. As many as 25,000 people marched in these parades.

Learn more:
-- PBS: https://www.pbs.org/video/the-vote-part-1-3kph5d/ (28 minutes in)
Saturday
21
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Join LWV-Richardson members just to socialize
Saturday
21
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#OnThisDay the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) ruled on the Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission case and made a controversial decision that reversed existing campaign finance restrictions and enabled corporations and other outside groups to spend unlimited funds on elections. #DarkMoney

"Prevention of improper corporate influence in the electoral process...is a pillar of our modern democracy" -- LWV Amicus Brief #DarkMoney

"Voters are supposed to be at the center of our political process. For more than two centuries, America’s constitutional democracy has been moving in the direction of broader enfranchisement and more meaningful political participation by American citizens. After the Civil War, the 15th Amendment to the Constitution guaranteed the right to vote to citizens regardless of race or color. The 19th Amendment provided voting rights to women, the 24th to poor citizens and the 26th to young adults.
On the other hand, our Constitution does not reflect a similar solicitude for corporate participation; indeed our constitutional history reflects a growing concern over the influence of corporations, and the distinction between the legal protections afforded to living persons and corporations has been part of our constitutional law from the Founding." -- LWV Commentary on Citizens United


LWVUS Amicus Brief: https://www.lwv.org/sites/default/files/Amicus_cfr.CitizenUnited.pdf
LWVUS Commentary on Citizens United: https://www.lwv.org/money-politics/league-commentary-citizens-united-v-fec-case-supreme-court
Brennan Institute: https://www.brennancenter.org/our-work/research-reports/citizens-united-explained
Monday
23
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Tuesday
24
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Wednesday
25
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Maud Wood Park. Park was the 1st president of the National League of Women Voters.

Learn more:

-- Suffragist Memorial: https://suffragistmemorial.org/november-2015-suffragist-of-the-month/

-- Harvard: https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/schlesinger-library/collection/papers-maud-wood-park-in-womans-rights-collection

-- LOC: https://www.loc.gov/resource/rbnawsa.n8361/?sp=8
Wednesday
25
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Charles Curtis, of Kaw, Osage, and Pottawatomie ancestry. Curtis was sworn in as the U.S. Senator from Kansas. Charles was also the 1st person of color and 1st person of Native American ancestry to hold the office of vice president under President Hoover.

Learn more:

-- Senate History: https://www.senate.gov/about/officers-staff/vice-president/VP_Charles_Curtis.htm

-- Kansas Historical Society: https://www.kshs.org/kansapedia/charles-curtis/12029
Wednesday
25
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Thursday
26
Thu, Jan 26, 2023
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Richardson Independent School District Board Meeting
Thursday
26
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Friday
27
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Saturday
28
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Sunday
29
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Monday
30
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Tuesday
31
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.

February, 2023

Wednesday
1
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Black History Month is celebrated in the United States and Canada each February. Black History Month traces its origins to Negro History Week which was first created in 1926 with the week chosen to coincide with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln (February 12th) and Frederick Douglass (February 14th). An annual monthlong celebration of black history was later proposed by students and educators at Kent State University in 1969, and adopted one year later. By the mid-1970s, Black History Month was celebrated across the United States and officially recognized by US President Gerald Ford in 1976. Originally intended to celebrate black history and culture in the United States, Black History Month has since spread to Canada, as well as the United Kingdom, Ireland, and the Netherlands, where it is celebrated in October.
Wednesday
1
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Thursday
2
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Friday
3
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#OnThisDay in 1870, the 15th Amendment, which granted black men the right to vote, was ratified. Unfortunately, Southern states continued to disenfranchise black voters through the use of poll taxes, literacy tests, threats of physical harm, etc. Therefore, the promise of the 15th Amendment was not fully realized until the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965--almost a century later.

The amendment was passed (proposed) by Congress on February 26, 1869, and ratified on February 3, 1870.

Learn more:

-- National Archives: https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/amendments-11-27

-- LOC: http://www.loc.gov/rr//program/bib/ourdocs/15thamendment.html

-- Teaching resources: https://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/elections/voting-rights-african-americans.html
Friday
3
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Saturday
4
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Sunday
5
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Monday
6
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Tuesday
7
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Wednesday
8
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.
Thursday
9
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Lawrence Aaron Nixon. Lawrence...

The Smith v. Allwright case ended the white primary, which suppressed the Black vote.

Learn More:
-- @TSHA: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fni10
-- @TxPolProject - White Primary: https://texaspolitics.utexas.edu/archive/html/vce/features/0503_01/smith.html
Thursday
9
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Juanita Jewel Craft. Juanita and Lulu Belle White of Houston organized 182 branches of the NAACP in Texas over a period of eleven years. Following the Smith v. Allwright ruling, in 1944 Juanita became the first black woman in Dallas County to vote in the Democratic Party primary. In 1946, she was the first black woman deputized in the state to collect the poll tax. Juanita was also a member of the League of Women Voters of Texas.


The Smith v. Allwright U.S. case ended the white primary.

Learn More:
-- http://www.juanitacrafthouse.org/
-- TSHA: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fcr59
-- TxPolProject - Smith v. Allwright: https://texaspolitics.utexas.edu/archive/html/vce/features/0503_01/smith.html
Thursday
9
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The first day to apply for a place on the May 6 2023 ballot is January 18, 2023. The last day to apply is Feburary 17, 2023.